Triumph 3TA / TwentyOne

The first of Triumph’s unit-construction twins provided practical transport 40 years ago. These days, the 350 performs best on gentle weekend rides… Geoff Painter bought his 3TA, aka the Triumph Twenty-one, in 1967 when it was just two years old. The 350 twin was supplied to Elite Motors in July of 1964 but wasn’t sold or registered until the following…

Triumph TSX Shock Shrouds Back In Stock

Among classic British bikes, Meriden’s venerable unit twins have perhaps the greatest range of parts still available at a reasonable price. That goes a long way towards explaining why the later T120s, T140s and TR7s make such straightforward restoration projects. However, Triumph’s rarer models have a nasty habit of using parts made from pure unobtanium, and the West-coast inspired factory…

Triumph Daytona T100R

Triumph introduced their unit-construction 500 twin in 1960. By 1966 it had evolved into a proper proddie racer, the Daytona, which packed considerable poke into its petite package. Marion Thirsk found an interesting example at last year’s Ayr Show… When Steve purchased this Daytona it’d been lying forlorn in a garage for seven years, with the fallen roof of the…

Triumph Visitor Experience

Triumph has a long history of making motorcycles which stretches all the way back to 1902. The firm’s history falls into two distinct parts* – the classic bike side and the modern motorcycles – and these are reflected in the company’s new Visitor Experience. Frank Melling has visited, and is experienced… First, there is what is usually called ‘Meriden’ Triumph…

Triumph Thunderbird

Back in the early 1980s, Triumph built a budget 650; a short-stroke version of the 750 Bonneville. These days the TR65 Thunderbird is proving to be a rewarding practical classic bike for one regular rider… ‘As I age,’ says RC regular Mark Holyoake, ‘my taste in bikes has changed. Gone are the days of race-reps and the like; I have…

Try A Classic Bike Day

  One of the benefits of becoming an official ‘Friend’ of the National Motorcycle Museum is that, besides free entrance to the museum and other goodies, they invite you to events like last weekend’s ‘Try A Classic Bike’ training day. For the nominal sum of £10 to cover insurance you get to ride a number of the museum’s exhibits around…